Tagged with experimental evolution

Manipulating the mouse penis bone, with science

Manipulating the mouse penis bone, with science

The girth of a mouse penis bone depends on the stiffness of the competition. That’s what Leigh Simmons and Renée Firman at the University of Western Australia found after several generations of experimental evolution in mice. Over the course of the experiment, male mice developed thicker penis bones (or bacula, if you want to be scientific about … Continue reading

Inbred females have more fun

Inbred females have more fun

Female red flour beetles (Tribolium castaneum) shouldn’t want to mate more than once. They get enough sperm from a single male to fertilize all their eggs, and mating with multiple males can actually harm them. So why do many red flour beetle females mate multiple times? New research published this week in Science provides one … Continue reading

Evolution, sex, and spiky penises

Evolution, sex, and spiky penises

Male seed beetles (Callosobruchus maculatus) have long spikes covering their penises (or adeagus, if you want to be scientific about it). These spikes are thought to have evolved in response to female promiscuity, as a way of increasing the male’s chances of fertilizing a female’s eggs. Females, in response to the spikes, have evolved every man’s worst … Continue reading