Tagged with sperm

Mosquito sperm need to smell to swim

Mosquito sperm need to smell to swim

You’ve probably had someone tell you, at some point in your life, that the sense of smell is the sense most tightly linked to memory. Now, scientists have found that at least for mosquitoes, the sense of smell is also linked to the ability of their sperm to swim. The research was published in February in … Continue reading

Sex in the news: April 1-7

Sex in the news: April 1-7

This week in sex news: Cornell University received a $10M Specialized Research Center grant from the National Institutes of Health to establish a Center for Reproductive Genomics. Researchers at the center will study the whys and hows of human reproduction and attempt to find new treatments for infertility. A meta-study concluded that antidepressants are harmful to … Continue reading

Don’t stress out your testicles!

Don’t stress out your testicles!

You probably don’t need science to tell you that when you’re stressed out you’re not likely to be in the mood. But can stress cause physical damage to your reproductive cells? A study published this month in the Journal of Sexual Medicine suggests that it just might. Rats aren’t all that different from people. They … Continue reading

What your testicles taste

What your testicles taste

Most people probably think of tastebuds as existing only on their tongues, but did you know there are taste buds in testes? It’s true. Sort of. They aren’t exactly like the taste buds in your mouth. Male germ cells–the cells that are destined to become sperm–have molecules on them that can detect bitter tastes. These … Continue reading

The discriminating vagina

The discriminating vagina

All kinds of things go into a woman’s vagina. Some are friendly (like sperm and vaginal microbes), and some are very bad (STDs). The immune system in the vagina has to be able to tell the difference and react appropriately. As you can imagine, the system isn’t perfect and sometimes things go terribly wrong. An … Continue reading

Sperm tracked in 3D

Sperm tracked in 3D

Despite referring to sperm as “sperms”, this paper showing 3D tracking of human sperm swimming paths is pretty cool. Actually, I take that back. Calling them sperms definitely adds to the awesomeness. I won’t pretend to fully understand the physics behind their method, but it’s obvious that this imaging method will be important for many … Continue reading

Male contraception: a new advance

Male contraception: a new advance

Good news, guys: one day soon you may not have to worry about whether your girlfriend remembered to take her pill. The bad news? You might actually have to be the one who remembers to take it. A group of researchers at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, and … Continue reading

Glucose ramps up sperm speed

Glucose ramps up sperm speed

The sperm of mice and men are streamlined cells, designed to move fast and deliver a payload. To maintain their Phelps-like speed through the long haul to the egg, sperm cells need energy. But even though sperm have all the equipment they need to turn fuel into energy, they don’t carry any fuel with them. … Continue reading

Get in my spermathecae!

Get in my spermathecae!

You may notice that this paper has been out for a while already, even though I really should have been excited to blog about it right away, given its importance for my field of study. But, lately, research has kept me too busy to actually sit down and write a decent post about it. So, … Continue reading

Gametes to spare–two stories for you!

Gametes to spare–two stories for you!

I haven’t been doing that much interwebbing lately, but I thought it would be best not to skip the weekly links again. However, I hesitate to call this a link “roundup” seeing as I only have 2 stories for today: sperm-shooting squid and egg-stacking beetles.

Egg jelly kicks sperm into gear in frogs

Egg jelly kicks sperm into gear in frogs

Sorry, but there won’t be any pictures of frogs having sex in this post. Why not? Because frogs (Xenopus laevis) are external fertilizers; the females lay their eggs in a pond, and then the males release sperm out into the open water. In just plain pond water, frog sperm will slow down within minutes. This is a … Continue reading